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TheFangirl

The Fangirl

Long time geek, fangirl, mother, and reader. I've got a lot to say, you might not like it all, but it will be honest and hopefully helpful.

Talking Sense About 'Fifty Shades of Grey', or, Fanfiction, Feminism, and BDSM

Talking Sense About 'Fifty Shades of Grey', or, Fanfiction, Feminism, and BDSM - John Lennard I know most people who see this book will assume, like I did, that it is another pointless, throwaway book looking to piggyback sales on the popularity of Fifty Shades of Grey. They would be wrong. What we have here is a well written, thoroughly researched and no holds bared exploration of the Fifty Shades of Grey.“A fannish obsession with Twilight may – not does, but certainly may – indicate a taste for unchallenging fare, cliched characters with teen emotions that are much stronger than they are interesting.”Talking Sense examines Fifty Shades of Grey’s roots in the Twilight fandom. Giving insight into the success of the story as both a fan fiction and a book. While also shedding light on the true history of the fan fiction version of Fifty Shades, Master of the Universe. As well as a not so flattering, but none the less accurate, look at author E.L. James"Ethically, at a general level, one could say that without Twilight itself, however flawed it may be, and without the Twilight fandom, there would have been no Master of the Universe [.]...so seeing James flourish through media articles commonly disparaging fanfic, and repeatedly failing in interview to acknowledge any of her debts, is depressing and unpleasant." It also addresses the matters of the impact the book's success has had on the perception of BDSM in the mainstream and the criticism it has received from feminist. Both of these issues are given comprehensive explanations of their history and relevance to the book. Showing the inescapable truth that Fifty Shades fails on both counts."Most importantly, by making her heroine, Ana Steele, a virgin who does not have BDSM fantasies of her own, but merely conforms to a man’s in the name of love – just as Bella internalises and rationalises Edward’s abusiveness in Twilight – James removes a primary claim on feministinterest and sympathy."As the above quotes demonstrate, the author doesn’t beat around the bush. Each of the deeply problematic aspects of Fifty Shades of Grey are clearly defined, backed up with comprehensive research and explained. Lennard does an amazing job of distilling the robust topics into easy to read “bite-size” sections, while still showing the overarching affect of the book. Making it very clear how damaging its success has been on the communities it exploited. Out of all the non-fiction books and articles written about Fifty Shades of Grey, this one is the most comprehensive and honest that I have read.This is a must read for anyone who wishes to discuss Fifty Shades of Grey with knowledge and authority.